Small Changes Make a Big Difference Part 6 – Daring

Daring what is is? The trait of Daring is defined by Rob Yeung as the willingness to take action in the face of uncertainty. It’s about having courage and conviction, about pursuing activities in spite of how apprehensive or even down right scared we might feel. Daring is about embracing opportunities, forging ahead and not worrying about looking ridiculous should things go wrong.

Small Changes make a big Difference – Daring

Daring what is is?  The trait of Daring is defined by Rob Yeung as the willingness to take action in the face of uncertainty.  It’s about having courage and conviction, about pursuing activities in spite of how apprehensive or even down right scared we might feel.  Daring is about embracing opportunities, forging ahead and not worrying about looking ridiculous should things go wrong.

We talk about daring being going out of your comfort zone, making minor improvements and changes to everything you do.  For instance before I started this business I was a camera avoider.  Now I am doing videos, and sharing photos of myself quite regularly.  I had never stuck to any writing before and now I am doing blogging reasonably regularly, so for me taking the leap and investing in this business in the strongest way by going what we call black or all-in was definitely stepping out of my comfort zone.

Most business people that practice the trait of Daring understand that you invest time and money into a thing and try it out.  Some things work and somethings don’t but you have to try and fail, understand why you fail and grow from that.  You can try and fail a number of things until something finally works but you have to know why you failed in the first place.  Do the analysis.

One of the things you are always told is what will you say you did with your life on your deathbed.  Will you have regrets? You need to distinguish between soul enriching risks and frankly dangerous ones.

Starting a new company after doing the research can be a good risk, outright gambling can be a bad decision.  Too many people settle for what they have.  Will you end up settling too?

A huge body of research shows that people who make goals are much more likely to take action and make positive changes than people who only have vague intentions.  What has also been discovered is the best way to make these goals work is to make sure they follow the PAST Acronym  of

P=Positive

A=Ambitious

S=Specific

T=Timebound

We make goals positive because our brains are hardwired to respond to signals from both reward and punishment.  You know from animal experiments that reward is always the best way to train.  For example in a study at University of Rochester they found that people that were setting avoidance goals for themselves (i.e. trying to get away from negative consequences) actually experienced a decline in their self-esteem and feelings of life satisfaction as compared to people who pursued approach goals (moving towards positive consequences) eg wanting to make friends was more successful than wanting to avoid feeling lonely.

Specific, Difficult goals consistently lead to high performance however goals that are too arduous can hurt performance.  The goal needs to be specific and challenging but not feel unattainable. Making ambitious, specific commitments is a great way to kick us into action.

It has been found that self-imposed deadlines boost our chances of getting things done.  Simply by making a personal pledge to do a certain task by a certain date can be good too.

The best way to meet our goals is to follow a stepwise approach.

  • Begin by drawing a staircase on a sheet of paper. Include at least six for a start.
  • Write down a few words about your current situation at the bottom of the staircase
  • Now write a short description about where you would like to get to at the top of the staircase
  • Now start working backwards from your goal to figure out the individual steps you will need to take.
  • Think about the order of the steps.  Which ones do you need to do first.
  • For each step consider
    • What are the specific actions you need to do?
    • Who can/should help?
  • You may need to re-draw your staircase several times adding further steps.

Drawing your staircase is only the first step.  Now you need to start taking action.

One of the best ways to promote Daring is to make people believe that you are changeable and can be developed, do not attach labels to them and encourage them that anything can be learned.

When encouraging children to be daring teach your children that their brain circuitry is malleable and it grows fresh connections and grows in response to stimulation and nearly anything can be improved with diligence.

Pursuing more opportunities does mean that we will fail more often so one way to give us a backstop for this is to have a Setback Manifesto. Exceptional people see blunders and failures as feedback, constructive criticism, and insight into what doesn’t work or what they should do differently.  Rather than seeing them as a sign that we should give up, setbacks can tell us that we may need to work harder, learn more, consider other options or adapt our tactics, or ask for help.  Repeated failures normally tell us that we should pursue something else but at least we know for certain what doesn’t suit us.

Remember that nothing in life can ever be certain.  High achievers believe in trial and error and take action even when matters are uncertain or they feel a little scared.

Remembering that a huge part of success is psychological read and train your brain by listening to empowering audios, doing training on ways to do business and training your mind that you will be successful.

If you want to see more about the traits of high achievers then check out the rest of the series below

Introduction

Part 2

Part 3

Part 4

Part 5

And if you want to join me on my journey of becoming a high achiever then leave your email address below and I will send you a book I created called 105 Inspirational quotes just for you

 

 

 This blog contains excerpts from the book The Extra One Percent by Rob Yeung